Thursday, 18 April 2013

#9 The Following Blog Post May Contain a Boy with No Foul Language


I try to be careful with the language I use around all three of my kids, even though only two of them can actually repeat what I say. It's not easy. And it means finding replacements for the swear words that surface when I'm clumsy and crack my head on a cupboard door (That hurt like a son of a pup!), or when I drop something sloppy on the kitchen floor (Gosh darn  it all!); when someone cuts me off while driving (Wiener brain!); when one of our electronic devices goes on the fritz (What the Sam Hill is wrong with this thing?); when I'm at the end of my tether with my kids' behaviour (Holy Mother of Pearl!); when...


Er, you get the picture.


If I happen to get upset and a curse word slips out, I don't have to worry about Carter repeating me. There are no bad words or swear words programmed into his talker, so while he may be exposed to bad language through classmates at school, via the TV or car radio, or from family members (I'm not shouldering all the responsibility here people), he doesn't actually have the means of expressing those words himself.



Here's one of my favourite examples of how parents use replacement words for swearing in order to keep things clean in front of the kids. This commercial makes it very 'apparent' how our use of language (and our whole way of life) changes after having kids.



The Mom, who's 'kind of a big deal' and her hubby, #1 Dad dedicate their message to all the mini van families out there.


When you're an awesome parent, "there's no mother-father swearing" in your house.




But, if you slip up, you won't hear your foul language repeated from a child who doesn't talk.



What are some of your swear word replacements?







Disclaimer: I have no affiliation with Toyota. I don't even drive one. I just think this ad is hilarious and I wanted to share it.
Views in the Not Being Able to Speak series are derived from my personal experience with Carter. I do not speak on behalf of others with complex communication needs. It is not my intent to minimize or disregard the power of expression that can be found through the use of augmentative and alternative forms of communication.

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